Starting with the ‘domain-specific language’ movement, and bolstered by the Pragmatic Programmers’ suggestion that programmers should learn a new language every year, the notion of ‘polyglot programming’ became something of a critics’ darling when talking about career paths. But somewhere along the way, it feels like the original intent has been lost, and the focus has shifted to ‘learn to program in as many languages as possible’. If you’re a software developer, and you’re currently fluent in one language, are you doomed to irrelevancy? Is it actually better to be a ‘jack-of-all-languages, master of none’, or is there some kind of happy medium in between? And if so, how do you tell when you’re in it?

In this talk, a polyglot, polycrepido and polypraeclusio programmer will talk about his experiences living across multiple languages, platforms and storage systems. It’s not all been a bed of roses, you’ll find, but there are advantages, up to a point. More to the point, by the end of the conversation, you’ll have a better idea of where you want to fit on the ‘polytechnical’ continuum, and how to make the necessary steps to get there.

Ted Neward

Ted Neward is an industry professional of twenty years’ experience. He speaks at conferences all over the world and writes regularly for a variety of publications across the Java, .NET, and other ecosystems. He currently resides in the Pacific Northwest with his wife, two sons, dog, four cats, eight laptops, seven tablets, nine phones, and a rather large utility bill.

The Busy Developer’s Guide to Polytechnical Careering

About The Author
- Mark is co-founder of Voxxed.com and organiser of Devoxx UK. He is involved in several technical community initiatives, including FindaTechJob.com Outside of work he can be found bumbling around the countryside in his VW camper rediscovering his inner hippie, giving his opinion to anyone who'll listen - and many who won't anyway.

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