Google’s AlphaGo is an extraordinary breakthrough for Artificial Intelligence. The game of 19×19 Go has 1.74×10^172 unique positions and is about a ‘googol’ times harder to calculate than chess. Experts thought it would take at least another decade before AI would be able to beat the best human players. So how did Google tackle this problem? What algorithms did they use and how do they work?

Join Roy van Rijn during his this session, recorded at Devoxx UK 2017

Roy van Rijn is a Software Craftsman at JPoint. He worked on miscellaneous projects and has given talks at Devoxx BE, Devoxx UK, Devoxx PL, Joy of Coding, J-Fall and J-Spring. He regularly gives trainings on various topics, including Spring, Software Architecture, Testing and Agile/Lean. He’s also a blogger (http://www.royvanrijn.com) and you can follow him on Twitter.

From Tic Tac Toe to AlphaGo: Playing games with AI and machine learning

About The Author
- Mark is co-founder of Voxxed.com and organiser of Devoxx UK. He is involved in several technical community initiatives, including FindaTechJob.com Outside of work he can be found bumbling around the countryside in his VW camper rediscovering his inner hippie, giving his opinion to anyone who'll listen - and many who won't anyway.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>