By Esther Schindler This post originally appeared over at the New Relic blog It’s time to get serious about improving your programming skills. Let’s do it! That’s an easy career improvement goal to give oneself, but “become a kick-ass programmer” is not a simple goal. For one thing, saying, “I want to get better” assumes that you […]

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Comments can be used to convey what code does, what it should to, what it does not do, why it exists, when and how it should and shouldn’t be used, and more. Let’s categorize them! Isn’t this boring? Well, maybe, although Carl didn’t think so. And I see it as an important next step in our discussion […]

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Fastly distributed systems engineer Ines Sombra (@randommood) is on a mission to get more developers reading academic journals. In this interview, she explains why diversifying your study list could boost your career, and where you can get started. Filmed at GOTO London 2015. You can all the info from here talk here: https://github.com/Randommood/GotoLondon2015 And if you’re inspired […]

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By Mike Croft Story time! I hope you’re all sitting comfortably. This story begins on a Tuesday, in London, after a particularly hectic first two days at the office. For those unaware, I don’t live in London, so when I’m scheduled to be with this particular customer, I get up very early in the morning […]

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You’re the elite. You know Clean Code by heart, you dream of SOLID design, and you unit-test every line you write. Your code is so self-documenting you don’t even need to write comments! Then this rant is just for you! Because let me tell you something: Without comments, working with your code is still a […]

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By Tori Wieldt Reposted from the New Relic Blog  What is Technical Debt? According to developer Nina Zakharenko’s session at PyCon 2015 Montreal 2015 last week, it’s the result of a series of bad decisions that force a developer to use more resources to accomplish less. In her session titled “Technical Debt: The Code Monster in Your Closet,” […]

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Java 8 has been described as the largest change to the Java platform since the beginning of Java, but there has not been a corresponding effort to remove obsolete features from the system. Some features have been deprecated, but very few have actually been removed. The platform has grown ever larger and more complex, resulting […]

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