One of the most common features for a login form is the remember me feature that allows users to be automatically signed in from a certain machine even after the HTTP session expires: Web applications usually implement this feature by using cookies. When the user selects the remember me option and signs in, the application stores a […]

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Yesterday it was announced that Java SE 8u111 (SE 8 update 111) and Java SE 8u112 are available, and “Oracle strongly recommends that most Java SE users upgrade to the latest Java 8 update, which includes important security fixes.” See the October Advisory on security from Oracle. Java SE 8u111 is a critical patch update (CPU), and Java […]

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This is the second in a series of articles looking at some of the JDK Enhancement Proposals (JEPS) hoping to make their way into Java 9. Last week we looked at JShell. This week, after looking at the good, the bad and the ugly the focus is on HTTP/2 in JEP 110. This proposal aims to define a new […]

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By Clay Smith This post was originally published over at the New Relic blog The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) underpins the World Wide Web and cyberspace. If that sounds dated, consider that the version of the protocol most commonly in use, HTTP 1.1, is nearly 20 years old. When it was ratified back in 1997, floppy […]

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By Fabio After a first post about HTTP clients, to which I redirect you for an introduction about efficient HTTP on the JVM, let’s now talk about HTTPservers. There are several benchmarks about HTTP servers out there but they’re often hindered by shortcomings such as: Not exercising effectively high-concurrency scenarios and, more generally, considering unrealistic and […]

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Originally published on the Codurance blog It seems that a new paradigm is coming. Facebook and Netflix have come up with different implementations for that idea. Some people are calling it Demand-Driven Architecture, but before I show you some solutions, let’s go over some history to understand the problem. I will use the example that […]

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By Tori Wieldt: This article was originally posted over at the New Relic blog If APIs are eating the world (as InformationWeek suggests), you can think of API documentation as recipes, a crucial part of making your API easy to understand and easy to use. Just as chefs rely on well-written recipes to create wonderful dishes, you need to […]

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By Fabio HTTP is probably the most popular application-level protocol and there are many libraries that implement it on top of network I/O, which is a special (stream-oriented) case of general I/O. Since all I/O has a much in common 1, let’s start with some discussion about it. I’ll concentrate on I/O cases with a lots […]

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This May saw the quiet foundation of a second epoch for the web with the final release of the HTTP/2 standard. The first revision of HTTP since 1997, this renovation of the long established protocol addresses the latency issues that have arisen with the advent of a broadband driven network. It also makes changes to how data is […]

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It’s hard to overstate how much has changed in the world since HTTP 1.1 went final, in June 1999. There were no smartphones, Google had not yet IPO’d, Java Swing was less than a year old—you get the idea. Yet for all that change, HTTP remains at version 1.1. Change is finally coming. HTTP 2.0 […]

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